On August 29 2005, the costliest natural disaster in American history slammed into Louisiana and Mississippi: Hurricane Katrina. The storm, at one point a powerful Category 5 on the Saffir-Simpson scale, made landfall as a Category 3 with winds of 200 km/h, devastating the coasts of the two states. At least 80% of New Orleans, Louisiana, was under water after the storm. More than 1.7 million people lost power. At the end of it all, nearly 2000 people were killed, thousands lost their homes, and it cost the U.S. more than $108 billion. After 10 year of hurricane, here you can see how is the city is now:

katrina7

September 11 2005 and July 29 2015 aerial photos show the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans flooded by Hurricane Katrina and the same area a decade later.

katrina2

September 2 2005 and August 14 2015 photos shows damage to a railroad track in Waveland, Miss., from Hurricane Katrina, and the same site a decade later which is undergoing repairs to drainage pipes underneath the track which were washed out in the historic storm.

katrina5

September 4 2005 and July 30 2015 photos show a makeshift tomb at a New Orleans street corner, concealing a body that had been lying on the sidewalk for days in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, and the same site a decade later with an artist’s memorial to the woman known as Vera.

katrina3

September 1 2005 and July 29 2015 photos show Harry and Silvia Pulizzano walking across debris from Hurricane Katrina in search of Silvia’s brother’s home in Waveland, Miss., and the same site a decade later.

katrina6

October 10 2005 and August 4 2015 photos shows a tangle of fishing boats blocking the lanes of Highway 23 in Empire, La. after Hurricane Katrina ravaged the region, and the same site a decade later.

katrina1

December 10 2005 and July 28 2015 photos show Valerie Thomas, of New Orleans, left, and her nieces Shante Fletcher, 6, and Sarine Fletcher, 11, right, looking at the destruction of Valerie’s brother’s home in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans after returning to it for the first time since Hurricane Katrina, and empty lots in the same area a decade later.

Source: GlobalNews

Advertisements